Support for Ukraine, NFTs, and a Carrot Costumed Marathon Record – Triathlete

“], “filter”: { “nextExceptions”: “img, blockquote, div”, “nextContainsExceptions”: “img, blockquote”} }”>

For access to all of our training, gear, and race coverage, plus exclusive training plans, FinisherPix photos, event discounts, and GPS apps, >”,”name”:”in-content-cta”,”type”:”link “}}”>sign up for Outside+.

World Triathlon offers support, assistance to Ukraine

World Triathlon (formerly ITU), the international governing body of the sport, released a statement on Friday indicating that they stand in “absolute solidarity with the Ukraine triathlon family and the entire country at this time of grave international crisis.” World Triathlon also said that they are working to coordinate support with all national federations and set up an email account (welcome@triathlon.org) for Ukrainian athletes to reach out and find a host family in another country (the email address is for anyone who is willing to host athletes, as well). Thus far, the National Federation of Latvia has identified families who are willing to temporarily take in triathletes, coaches, or officials from Ukraine. In addition, the directors of the Lievin Europe Triathlon Cup, set for March 12 in France, will offer free accommodation for Ukrainian athletes that can be extended for “as long as necessary if those individuals would prefer to remain there for an extended period after the race.”

Rouvy sets up virtual charity ride around Kiev

In another show of support for Ukraine, virtual cycling platform Rovy has pledged to donate one Euro to UNICEF for each person who completes an easy 42-kilometer virtual trip around Ukraine’s capital Kiev. The Czech Republic-based company, whose community includes some 900,000 cyclists around the world, estimates “no less than €25,000 in humanitarian aid will be sent to people in Ukraine.” (As of Saturday, 3,575 cyclists had completed the Kiev ride.) “We consider it important to let Rouvy users know our stance regarding the war in Ukraine,” said Rouvy CEO statement Petr Samek, in a.

Pro triathletes announce new partnerships

Several professional triathletes have announced new partnerships this week: Sam Long, the 2021 Ironman 70.3 World Championship runner-up, has been named a global ambassador for wetsuit and swim gear brand Aquasphere; Australian Olympian Ashley Gentle, who will be competing in the 70.3 scene this season, has signed with Scott bikes; British Olympian Georgia Taylor-Brown and Ironman ace Joe Skipper are now part of Bahrain Endurance, joining Alistair Brownlee, Daniela Ryf, Jan Frodeno, Kristian Blummenfelt, and more; and Mirinda Carfrae and Tim O’Donnell are the latest athletes to partner with InsideTrackerthe personalized blood tracking performance and nutrition system.

Daniela Ryf to race in Dubai

Reigning Ironman world champ Daniela Ryf shared that she’s opening up her 2022 season at Ironman 70.3 Dubai on March 5. The 34-year-old, who last raced in September at the Ironman 70.3 world champs, posted that she’s “looking forward to race and to get a first reality check.” Ryf will be aiming to defend her title in Dubai, which she handily won in 2021 over countrywoman Imogen Simmonds.

World Triathlon steps into the NFT scene

World Triathlon has joined the world’s biggest sports organizations, including the NBA and NFL, in entering the world of Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs). Through a new partnership with NFT Design Works, the organization will bring triathlon fans the opportunity to own and trade exclusive digital moments in the sport in the form of NFTs—which are unique, digital certificates stored on a blockchain, providing certain ownership rights in an asset, like a digital work of art . This isn’t the first time an NFT has been sold in the sport: In July, an exclusive NFT digital memorabilia from Jan Frodeno’s performance in the Zwift Tri Battle Royale was auctioned off, with part of the proceeds going towards Frodeno’s non-profit organization.

Utah man sets Guinness World Record for running a marathon…in a carrot costume

Jordan Maddocks has an impressive athletic resume, which includes an Ironman finish and several marathons. But perhaps his greatest feat to date is running a 2:44 marathon—in a carrot costume. The performance, which he logged at the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon in Phoenix in January, is now an official Guinness World Record for the fastest marathon while dressed as a vegetable. Maddocks, who began the costumed capers to support a friend battling cancer and now runs for charity, also holds the unofficial record for the fastest fruit over 26.2 miles, running 2:41:27 in 2020 while dressed like a banana.

Podcast Notes

  • On the Fitter & Faster podcast, expert bike fitter Ivan O’Gorman joins host Emma-Kate Lidbury to talk all things bike fitting.
  • Michael D’hulst, the CEO of Super League Triathlon, heads to The Triathlete Hour to chat about his career and how he’s trying to “make short course cool again.”
  • Bob Babbitt talks with the inspiring Nathan Ford, an elite age-group triathlete from Wales, who suffered serious injuries after an accident during the bike leg at the British Middle Distance Triathlon Championships.
  • The Inside Tri Show host Helen Murray heads to Girona, Spain to learn more about the triathlon training hub, sharing unique insight from British pro Laura Siddall and former pro cyclist Christian Meier.
  • Siddall also appears on this week’s episode of the TriDoc podcastwhich also features a review of the science on spirulina supplements
  • 70.3 star (and Wisconsin resident) Jackie Hering joined Another Mother Runner to talk about how she stays fit—and warm—during the winter.
  • The Oxygen Addict podcast covers the benefits of yoga for triathletes.
  • That Triathlon Life focuses on how to maximize indoor triathlon training and offers some bike tech tips.
  • 2000 Olympic gold medalist Simon Whitfield is featured on the REAL Triathlon podcastwhere he reflects on his career and how today’s athletes can find a champion’s mindset.
  • The IronWomen podcast showcases Spanish triathlete Sara Perez Sala, who came into the sport as an Olympic swimmer and had a breakout year in 2021.

Get all the latest triathlon news in your inbox twice/week. Sign up for the Triathlete email newsletter.

Leave a Comment